Okay, I lied yesterday…I didn’t manage a second post. But better late than never…

Near the Lapidarium, in the same square, is the Gallery at Bethlehem Chapel, where the Makers performances take place. This space has been beautifully outfitted as a kitchen prep and food performance space; in between the food performances, they’re also serving coffee and snacks. I’m interested in food performance – well, who isn’t? – but in particular I have an interest in the use of food performance as a means of getting at ecological/environmental concerns. Some of the “Makers” performances seemed aimed at addressing such concerns. One that I managed to catch, “Food at War,” was put together by Italian students, and pitted an advocate of “slow food” against an advocate of “fast food.” The performance itself was a testament to “slowness” – it lasted over four hours. Here are some photos of the “Makers” space.

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Food at War. Photo: Bruno Micovilovich

Food at War. Photo: Bruno Micovilovich

At the Kafka House – about a 5 minute walk away from the Lapidarium at the Bethlehem Chapel, on the edge of Prague’s Old Jewish Quarter – are the remainder of the student exhibitions – three floors’ worth! Again, some highlights, as writing about all of them would be impossible (and again, in no particular order…):

Italy – “TranSite”  The Italian students’ installation transports the visitor under the sea, where so many migrants have perished in recent months. The scenographic arrangement of nets and detritus, with a large inflatable raft above, invites you to imagine yourself in the place of a migrant whose flight to a better life has ended tragically. This photo doesn’t adequately capture how powerful this exhibit is.

Italian Student installation. Photo: M. Perdriel.

Italian Student installation. Photo: M. Perdriel.

Sweden – “Costume in Change”  These whimsical and inventive costumes by second year students from the Stockholm Academy of Dramatic Art are ingenious and kind of magical.

Swedish Student Exhibition. Photo: M. Perdriel

Swedish Student Exhibition. Photo: M. Perdriel

Swedish Student Exhibition. Photo: M. Perdriel

Swedish Student Exhibition. Photo: M. Perdriel

Swedish Student Exhibition. Photo: M. Perdriel

Swedish Student Exhibition. Photo: M. Perdriel

Swedish Student Exhibition. Photo: M. Perdriel

Swedish Student Exhibition. Photo: M. Perdriel

Swedish Student Exhibition. Photo: M. Perdriel

Swedish Student Exhibition. Photo: M. Perdriel

Russia – “Do you want to speak bad English with us about Art?”  I don’t have a picture of this installation because it’s not about presenting finished work. Instead, Russian students have transported their studio to Prague, installed it in a room on the second floor of Kafka’s House, and are inviting visitors to sit and work with them – in other words, their process is on display. They won a Special Award for Best Shared Process in a Student Exhibition for this installation.

Kubinia  This whimsical exhibition by students from the University of Utrecht invites the visitor to find out whether or not they are “Korrekt” enough to be allowed into the nation of Kubinia. Photos were not “korrekt,” so I have no images to share, but I’m pleased to share that I was “korrekt”!

Belgium – “The Take Off”

The Belgian student exhibition is a “library” of books that have been transformed by students into exquisite scenographic storytelling devices. These students display an impressive range of approaches to the task of transforming a book into an object that tells stories in another way. I was thoroughly captivated by this installation, as you can tell from the number of photos I have to share of it.

Belgian student exhibition. Photo: W. Arons

Belgian student exhibition. Photo: W. Arons

Belgian student exhibition. Photo: W. Arons

Belgian student exhibition. Photo: W. Arons

Belgian student exhibition. Photo: W. Arons

Belgian student exhibition. Photo: W. Arons

Belgian student exhibition. Photo: W. Arons

Belgian student exhibition. Photo: W. Arons

Belgian student exhibition. Photo: W. Arons

Belgian student exhibition. Photo: W. Arons

Belgian student exhibition. Photo: W. Arons

Belgian student exhibition. Photo: W. Arons

Belgian student exhibition. Photo: W. Arons

Belgian student exhibition. Photo: W. Arons

Hungary – “The Collector’s Room”  My kids voted this their favorite; like the Belgian and the Latvian exhibitions, this installation grows out of a design assignment. It’s an ingenious one. Each student imagines into being a person who is obsessed with collecting something. The student must then describe their collector’s personality, imagine how they dress and behave, and build a small model of their collector’s room with its collection. The exhibition itself is conceived as the room of a collector whose passion is to collect these collections. The little rooms designed by the students were intricately detailed and intriguing, and the stories that accompanied them demonstrated how well this exercise worked as an invitation to create a small, fully realized theatrical world. This exhibit was less “slick” than many others; a sign on the wall made note that the Hungarian students are on their own when it comes to procuring resources for their projects.

This guy, for example, collects washing machines…

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And this person collects pictures of strangers, and has had to build bespoke cabinetry and stairways to display all of the images…

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This is the space of a collector of clocks and timepieces…

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Hungary student detail

And this gentleman collects violins.IMG_0272_2There was also a creepy dentist who liked to collect teeth. I didn’t get a good shot of that one.

Tomorrow is the last day of PQ15. But I’ve got quite a bit more to cover, so I’ll be posting for the next couple of days at least. Stay tuned for more highlights…